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Checklist of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in tropical forests

Frederico Marinho, Iolanda R. da Silva, Fritz Oehl & Leonor C. Maia

Sydowia 70: 107-127

Published online on May 3rd, 2018

Tropical forests account for about 50 % of all world biodiversity, playing a key role in the functioning of the globe. These forests are divided into six natural vegetation formations: Lowland evergreen rainforests, Semi-evergreen rainforests, Dry for­ests, Lower montane forests, Upper montane forests and Mangroves. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF - Glomeromycotina) are among the organisms commonly found and directly related to the balance and functioning of these plant communities. This re­view shows the record of 228 AMF species in tropical forests, distributed in 14 families and 35 genera, representing 75 % of the known richness of this group of soil fungi. The Dry forests exhibit the largest number of AMF species. Areas under anthropic influence in the various forest formations generally present a decrease in richness when compared to natural preserved areas.

Keywords: dry forest, evergreen forest, Glomeromycotina, mangrove, montane forest, richness, vegetation types.

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